toilet musuem

A visit to one of the weirdest museums in the world: the Toilet Museum

Toilet Museum

When I asked someone about a shop, he said it was near the Sulabh Shauchalaya (Sulabh Toilet). That was a weird landmark, I thought, until spotting Sulabh International situated on a sprawling green landscape which does a number of commendable work in the field of sanitation. So I decided to visit the world famous and the most exciting of the Sulabh institutions – the Sulabh International Toilet Museum.

Inside Toilet Museum

The initial inhibition I had about talking on the subject of toilet and defecation was removed when Shikha, the guide at the Museum, explained the various types of commodes used different ages of history.  “Urination ought to be done at least at a distance of 10 cubits from the source of water. Defecation to be done at a distance of 100 cubits from the source of water.” read the Aryan Code of Toilets, displayed at the museum. Read this post to know now solar power plant drastically reduced the electricity bill of a hospital

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Weird exhibits

The Toilet Museum is unique and has been rated as the third
most weirdest museum in the world. There is an interesting collection of toilets and commodes from around the world. The mobile commodes used by the Englishmen during hunting camps and the throne like commode used by King Louis XIV of France. The museum also has charts and pictures about the the sanitation systems beginning from the Harappan civilization to the space age. A picture shows how bad sanitation system caused the black death in the 14th Century.

Toilet Museum

Works at Sulabh International

Dr. Bindeshwar Pathak, the founder of Sulabh International, developed eco-friendly two-pit, pour-flush compost toilet technology, Sulabh Shauchalaya, for the individual households as an alternative to the comparatively expensive septic tank based systems. This Toilet technology has been recommended as a Global Best Practice by UN bodies for about three billion people across the globe. The advantage of the toilet system is its affordability and adaptability. According to the availability of material in the region the toilet is altered. One interesting toilet was for those who were used to defecate in the open. The toilet was roofless and with spiraling steps leading to the toilet, so that they can defecate without closing the doors.

Total usage of waste

Nothing went waste at Sulabh. The defecated were dried and used as manure. The urine and waste water was recycled to produced that was used for all purpose other than drinking. The garden lights is run on Bio-electricity and cooking is done with Bio-gas.

There was so much to learn from the trip apart from seeing some of the weirdest commodes in the world. Toilets and sanitation is an essential aspects of the lifestyle of a city. We need to talk about sanitation and hygiene as openly as we talk about health, diet and environment.

4 thoughts on “A visit to one of the weirdest museums in the world: the Toilet Museum”

  1. Dear Ms. Ann Ancy,

    Thanks for your e-mail dated March 24, 2015 about your experiences after visiting the Sulabh International Museum of Toilets. We are further thankful for doing a beautiful story on our unique Museum.

    While visiting your website lifestyletodaynews.com to locate your above blog, I was happy to have seen some equally important other blogs also. I wish more and more readers and page-viewers to visit this highly interesting website to get acquainted with the latest in the field of lifestyle developments. My good wishes to the said web in general and to you in particular.

    With highest regards,

    Yours sincerely,

    Bindeshwar Pathak
    Founder
    SULABH INTERNATIONAL SOCIAL SERVICE ORGANISATION

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